Feeds

PayPal to move into the shop - without cards or NFC

Skip the queues, scan barcodes with your phone

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

PayPal is consigning the shop till to the dustbin in a way that could completely wipe Visa and MasterCard out of the shopping equation.

The website is gearing up to allow punters to pay for products in-store by scanning barcodes with a mobile, and allow payments to be authorised with a phone number - among other new features.

Merchants will be able to push location-based adverts and vouchers, and the site will offer a buy-now-pay-later service. What's more, there's no demand for an NFC chip.

Some strategic start-up acquisitions, including the snapping up of BillMeLater.com and shop search website Milo.com, have given PayPal the firepower to break into these new areas.

PayPal has whizzed up a glossy video explaining it all, but here's how a shopping trip could play out in the future:

  1. Payment at the till with your mobile number: Tap in your phone number and PIN at the cash register to authorise a payment from your chosen bank account. No credit card is involved.
  2. Payment at the till with a PayPal card: Customers who like the feel of plastic can use a PayPal card, which is not associated with a bank and just needs a swipe and correct PIN.
  3. Payment with your phone: Scan a barcode with your mobile in a shop and pay for it immediately with an app, skipping the checkout queues.
  4. Finding and ordering products on your phone in the shop and get them delivered to your house: You see a t-shirt in a shop, but they don't have it in your size. You can scan the barcode again, search through the shop's inventory for one that's right (using technology that PayPal bought from Milo), buy it on your phone, and order it for delivery to your house.

One major strength of the PayPal model is that it doesn't necessarily require new kit for the consumer and merchant, giving it the edge over wireless NFC-based rivals.

The other is that PayPal already has 100m customers. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?