Feeds

Powermat crafts wireless Duracell Bunny boiler

Saves interminable plugging and unplugging like a SLAVE

New hybrid storage solutions

Procter & Gamble, owner of the Duracell brand, has announced a joint venture with induction-charging effort Powermat, with P&G having the controlling interest in the new Duracell Powermat.

Powermat gets an undisclosed lump of cash and a 45 per cent interest in the operation, which will develop Duracell-branded products incorporating the Powermat's wireless charging technology. The deal isn't exclusive and Duracell Powermat could switch technologies in the future - but one way or another there will be wireless charging coming from Duracell.

That's in consumer retail. Powermat kit being built into cars made by General Motors and (we're told) office furniture will still be Powermat branded and supplied without P&G's involvement, but the stuff in the shops should start being branded Duracell from early next year.

This is probably bad news for Duracell's myGrid product, which already competes with Powermat. Both technologies require the back of one's phone to be replaced or wrapped in a new casing, but myGrid relies on cunningly placed pins resting on the right plates rather than the truly-wireless induction method used by Powermat.

But despite being technically impressive, Powermat hasn't made any great inroads and hasn't achieved the all-important incorporation into devices that's needed to make the technology really useful. Powermat envisions desks equipped with invisible chargers that supply current to anything laid on top of them, but that will only work if lots of devices support the standard and don't need bulky (and expensive) retro-fitted cases.

Which is why Duracell Powermat is keeping its technical options open, so the brand can live on even if some other standard takes off.

But that still assumes wireless charging will take off, which is far from certain: punters have learnt to keep the right chargers handy and charging gadgets over USB has removed much of the frustration around keeping things powered up.

Wireless charging remains cool but pointless at best, something that won't change even when it has a copper top. ®

The next step in data security

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.