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Romanian dragon-wolves aim for virtualised security

BitDefender looks to build bigger with BRICs

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BitDefender is focusing on providing better security for virtualised environments and says expansion into emerging markets is key to its plans for growth.

The Romanian firm wants to help firms implementing server consolidation projects to improve their security with a virtual appliance so that companies do not have to run anti-malware instances on virtual machines. The products, developed for virtual desktops (eg Citrix) as well as server farms, allow sysadmins to scan virtual machines on the same system in sequence rather than all at the same time.

Traditional scheduled security scans in virtualised environments take up too many resources. As a result, sysadmins sometimes turn off such scans, leaving a security gap that BitDefender aims to bridge. Beta versions of the BitDefender Security for Virtualised Environments do not check patching levels, but this feature may be introduced over time.

The technology also creates a mechanism to scan older copies of virtual machine builds offline.

The main markets for BitDefender, which claims 400 million users, include Romania, France and the US. The firm is seeking to grow further by targeting emerging economies such as Brazil, Russia, India and China. Part of this strategy invokes a rebranding of the security firm, with a new Dragon-Wolf logo (which looks more like a wolf-snake). Symbols of the Dragon Wolf were worn on the armour of ancestors of Romanian locals, the Dacians, at the time they fought the Romans (they fell to the empire in 106 AD).

BitDefender wants to inspire the creation of more IT jobs in Romania, a country whose economy is dominated by oil and steel. Although numerous consultants and IT integrators exist, it is the only IT developer of any size in the country. ®

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