Feeds

BT to fibre-up another 114 exchanges

'Local monopolies benefit no one' thunders exec

Boost IT visibility and business value

BT is upgrading a further 114 exchanges – the majority of which will receive fibre to the cabinet (FTTC) technology.

The telco said this morning that the latest rollout would serve one million homes and businesses in the UK. The latest exchanges earmarked by BT are listed here.

Its Openreach division said that it planned to complete the upgrades by the end of autumn 2012.

BT has committed £2.5bn to its plan to bring "superfast" broadband to two-thirds of homes and businesses in the UK by the end of 2015.

Along the way, it has been upsetting rival ISPs. Last weekend, TalkTalk's commercial boss David Goldie claimed that BT was trying to regain "the monopoly position that it lost many years ago" courtesy of its provision of fibre optic broadband.

That's a claim BT has repeatedly batted aside.

"Unlike other companies, BT will offer access to service providers on an open, wholesale and equivalent basis thereby supporting a competitive market," said BT in a statement announcing the exchange upgrades today.

BT is hoping to "pass"* 10 million homes and businesses during the course of 2012.

It is also ambitiously pursuing more investment from the broadband cash recently handed out from central government to local authorities in the UK, in an effort to get its fibre into 90 per cent of homes.

“There is no substitute for experience when it comes to fibre deployment and we have more experience than anyone," said Openreach managing director Mike Galvin.

"We are also committed to offering open and equivalent access so that customers can benefit from a competitive market. Local monopolies benefit no one and no public funds should go to supporting them,” he added.

The FTTC installs should eventually offer download speeds of up to 80Mbit/s and upstream speeds of 10Mbit/s, while fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) will completely replace old metal lines. Customers connected to them can expect to receive about 100Mbit/s downstream.

But as The Register was first to report in May this year, BT was forced to delay the rollout of its FTTP tech, after roughly a quarter of its trials found engineers taking two days to blow cables into customers' homes.

Trials were taking twice as long as anticipated due to duct blockages that needed to be cleared. Some people who had dug up their gardens presented problems for BT engineers, who have found the infrastructure troublesome. ®

*BT uses the "passed" terminology to point out that its infrastructure sometimes passes homes that don't have a copper line.

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Google Nest, ARM, Samsung pull out Thread to strangle ZigBee
But there's a flaw in Google's IP-based IoT system
Orange spent weekend spamming customers with TXTs
Zero, not infinity, is the Magic Number customers want
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
'Two-speed internet' storm turns FCC.gov into zero-speed website
Deadline for comments on net neutrality shake-up extended to Friday
Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup
Just hook us up to more 10Gbps ports, backbone biz yells in tit-for-tat spat
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.