Feeds

Industry pitches piracy research ahead of Attorney General meeting

Lobbying paper points the bone at Aussies, again

The essential guide to IT transformation

Sixty percent of Australians don’t use downloading or streaming sites, but that’s not the way the latest research into piracy activity in this country is being spun.

The research that gave nearly two-thirds of us clean hands in the piracy debate – and seems to ignore the growth in legal streaming services like the ABC’s iView, FetchTV and others – is mainly being used to wag the finger at Australians because most of us don’t see ourselves as part of the problem.

We are, apparently, such hypocrites. The research, here, helpfully highlights the talking point that 74 percent of respondents don’t think they’re part of the problem, and that 72 percent agree that piracy harms the industry, which seems reasonable enough if, as the research also states, most of the respondents aren’t involved in piracy.

Is that how the study is reported stories like this from News? Of course not: “Australians are in denial about the impact of piracy on the creative industries” thunders the Australian (directly contradicting the number of people that think piracy harms industries).

The listing of sites visited by respondents to the research should, in fact, be encouraging for the creative industries, since it seems to indicate that we’re willing to take the legal option if it’s available. LimeWire usage fell by six percent between 2009 and 2011; while the PirateBay rose to eight percent and BitTorrent to five percent, the ABC (iView) matched PirateBay at eight percent, Channel 10 reached five percent, and even BigPond’s subscriber videos were mentioned by three percent of respondents.

Of the services named, the biggie was YouTube: sure, there’s a fair amount of infringing material there, but also a lot that’s not (and if the content industries wish to deal with YouTube, then Google should be the target rather than the users). However, if the research is accurate, and if there’s a high overlap within usage of illegal sites, you would have a great deal of difficulty finding one in ten Australians who routinely visit illegal download sites.

As the research itself finds: among its respondent base – which is skewed, since the quantitative data was gathered in online survey forms – only 11 percent self-identified as current file sharing users.

The research isn’t just a bit of newspaper fodder, however: it’s also a shot over the lobbying bows. The Attorney-General is holding a confab next week, and high on the industry’s list is to shift enforcement onto ISPs. So it’s no surprise that in the focus groups – six groups each of six individuals – the researchers found that “72% would cease infringing if they received a notice from their ISP”.

The research puts it this way: “Focus groups reveal ISPs seen to facilitate piracy but appear to show no responsibility”, a statement which seems to mirror the arguments the industry took to the Federal Court and had rebuffed. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.