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ExaGrid scoops the dedupe pool

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Who's the mid-range deduplication boss? ExaGrid is, beating Data Domain and Quantum appliances in a survey ranking 37 dedupe appliances.

ExaGrid's EX1300E has scooped the mid-range dedupe pool, being named Best-in-Class in a DCIG survey comparing appliances priced between $20,000 – $100,000, and beating Data Domain and Quantum.

DCIG's 2011 Midrange Deduplication Appliance Buyer's Guide (62-page PDF) ranks the appliances as Best-in-Class, Recommended, Excellent, Good, and Basic, based on suppliers' publicity material, a 70-question survey, an interview, user input, and DCIG staff weightings of the input data.

The input data referred to deduplication management, hardware, scalability and technical support.

The report has been effectively bought by ExaGrid and made publicly available. DCIG says that, although it has paid relationships with some of the suppliers mentioned, none of them paid for entry in the report or for any influence whatsoever in its preparation and production by DCIG.

ExaGrid says its evaluated products were rated as “Excellent” for hardware specifically, and “Recommended” in general.

Comparing deduplication market leader Data Domain and ExaGrid, the report says:

The EMC Data Domain and ExaGrid midrange deduplication appliances were neck-and-neck in terms of functionality in many respects. However the primary reasons as to why the ExaGrid models ended up in the Top 3 and the ExaGrid EX13000E achieved the “Best-in-Class” ranking included:
  • Optional software licenses at no additional charge

  • Its scale-out architecture enables organizations to scale performance linearly and add capacity in modular increments while minimizing the need to replace existing nodes
  • It scaled to offer a higher raw storage capacity than other models with this ranking

El Reg is not going to blow ExaGrid's trumpet any more here. The DCIG report looks at each of the 37 products in detail so you can see how each rates according to your own criteria and pick the right one for your needs. ®

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