Feeds

Waterstone's to take on Kindle and Nook with own reader

Another chance to buy someone's cash register for them

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Waterstone's is to launch its own ereader in the hopes of competing with Amazon's Kindle next year.

The company's managing director, James Daunt, said that he had been inspired by the Nook, US bookseller Barnes & Noble's ereader.

A spokesperson for Waterstone's told The Reg he had no comment on the plan, announced by Daunt on BBC 4 radio.

The advent of ebooks, and even selling actual books online, has given bricks-and-mortar bookshops the same headaches that iTunes gave high street CD-sellers, and while Waterstone's does sell ebooks and books on its website, it has had a hard time competing with Amazon.

The chain, which is the last one standing in the UK after the demise of Borders and Books Etc, has been in the midst of a transformation since HMV Group sold it to Russian businessman Alexander Mamut.

He brought in Daunt – the owner of specialist London bookshop chain Daunt Books – to turn the bookseller around. Daunt has so far ditched the chain's decade-old 3-for-2 offer and vowed to shake the joint up to rescue its flagging sales.

Barnes & Noble has consistently credited the Nook for its good sales, reporting in the first quarter of this year that sales associated with the device, including the hardware, content and accessories, had jumped 140 per cent to $277m from the first quarter of 2010.

Amazon does not release sales figures on the Kindle, nor tell us how many it has sold, but analysts reckon the etailer will sell around 17 million units this year and make around $3.5bn from all related sales.

Waterstone's will have to hook up with a hardware partner if it hopes to launch its own ereader, as Barnes and Noble did with Foxconn, the well-known Taiwanese manufacturer of iPhones. The announcement of a partnership could well be imminent, however, with Daunt claiming the project was "well down the planning line" and would launch in the first quarter of 2012. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?