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Ultrabook makers turn to fibreglass to cut costs

Cheaper to make, cheaper to sell

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Take this as you will, but it's claimed that many upcoming Ultrabook laptops will use a fibreglass chassis to bring production costs down to the point where their vendors can sell the machines for under $1000 (£627).

According to the inevitable 'unnanmed industry sources', cited by DigiTimes, fibreglass may be used instead of the preferred magnesium-aluminium alloy because it's half the price.

Chip maker Intel, which owns the Ultrabook trademark and defines the Ultrabook spec, is said to have recently introduced Mitac to notebook vendors as a potential supplier of fibreglass chassis parts.

Intel wants to get Ultrabooks into as many punters' hands as possible, and getting the price down below $1000 is considered to be essential to do so.

And its suggestion seems to have fallen on receptive ears. According to the report, Acer, Asus and Lenovo have all signed up Mitac to produce fibreglass frames. ®

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