Feeds

Nvidia boss: Windows 8 will run Windows Phone 7 apps

Welcome to the world after Intel

A new approach to endpoint data protection

Nvidia has been outlining a future that sees a Qualcomm/Nvidia duopoly providing processors for every computing platform, which will share apps as well as chips.

Nvidia's CEO has been briefing journalists, including C-Net's Roger Cheng, pointing out that the company's Tegra chipsets are already powering half of the Android smartphones, and 70 per cent of tablets, and are looking forward to getting radio signal processing integrated too. But the CEO also made clear his belief that applications developed for Windows Phone 7 would find themselves happy running on Windows Desktop 8.

That's not something Microsoft has said, not publicly at least, but it is also not a huge jump once Windows 8 is running on an ARM core, and given that Windows Phone 7 applications are developed using Silverlight and XNA.

Apple has certainly gained from the closeness of iOS and OS X, though it has stopped short of combining them so far. Steven Sinofsky, Windows Live president, recently hinted that Windows 8 might have two separate interfaces: the touch-friendly Windows-Phone-like Metro and something more suited to the keyboards and mice with which we are familiar. Making Metro support Windows Phone 7 apps would seem a small step indeed.

But Nvidia is more interested in talking about a future without Intel, where everything is ARM-based and Qualcomm is the only other company with significant market share.

It's an interesting shift, particularly since the trend had been to reduce component counts by integrating graphics into the processor. Nvidia came from the other direction – integrating a processor into its graphics – and has done very nicely out of the increased demand for responsive GUIs, and applications, on mobile devices.

Both Qualcomm and Nvidia are ARM licensees, using the low-power processor core architecture designed by the chaps up in Cambridge. Qualcomm's Snapdragon chip integrates that with graphics and radio processing, while the Tegra hasn't got radio integrated yet (but coming soon) but draws on the company's history of graphic innovation.

It's easy to discount Intel in such a race – ARM is the brand everyone is looking for these days – but Intel is still making billions of dollars every year, enough to fund a MeeGo or two in the hope of creating a proper response to Microsoft's defection. ®

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

More from The Register

next story
PEAK LANDFILL: Why tablet gloom is good news for Windows users
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
POW! Apple smites Macbook Air EFI firmware update borkage
Fruity firm provides digital balm for furious fanbois
Fiendishly complex password app extension ships for iOS 8
Just slip it in, won't hurt a bit, 1Password makers urge devs
Mozilla keeps its Beard, hopes anti-gay marriage troubles are now over
Plenty on new CEO's todo list – starting with Firefox's slipping grasp
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?