Feeds

Dell chums up with Baidu for China smartphone charge

Reckons 200 million registered users can't be wrong

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Dell is partnering with China's Baidu on smartphones and tablets as its fortunes start to flag in Western markets.

On Friday, Baidu, China's most popular search engine, announced its Android-based software platform Baidu Yi for smartphones and Dell is shaping up to be its first hardware partner.

"We can confirm our partnership with Baidu for our smartphones in China through our participation in Baidu's Mobile Terminal Union," Dell Singapore spokeswoman Adeline Lee told The Reg.

She refused to give a timeline for the launch of any devices, but sources told local media that it could be as early as November, Reuters reported.

Dell hasn't had much luck with its Android devices so far in Western markets, dropping its Streak 5 from the US in August, and is no doubt hoping that China's gigantic pool of mobile users has room for its products.

Although Apple's Tim Cook has said the first three months of 2011 saw iPhone sales in "Greater China" grow around 250 per cent, the fruity firm only held 8.3 per cent of the smartphone market by the end of 2010, according to Beijing beancounter Analysys International. So, while the popularity of the Great White Phone is on the up, there's still plenty of space in China's technology-loving hearts for some new gadgets.

If any company can stall the Jobsian revolution in its tracks, it's probably Baidu, one of China's most popular brands and pretty much the only search engine since Google made its high-profile exit last year. And although Baidu Yi is Android-based, Baidu execs haven't ruled out developing their own operating system for smartphones. Dell is similarly flexible when it comes to OS, with devices loaded with Android and Windows on the market.

CEO Robin Li said last week that Baidu currently has 200 million registered users, while China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology has said that the country has 900 million mobile phone users – the kind of eye-watering figures that could encourage more firms to hitch their wagon to Baidu. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.