Feeds

Two UK suspects cuffed in Anonymous manhunt

Computer Misuse Act invoked

Remote control for virtualized desktops

British police have arrested two men as part of a continuing investigation with the FBI into computer attacks carried out under the flags of the Anonymous and Lulz Security hacking crews.

The men, aged 20 and 24, were arrested on Thursday in Mexborough, near Doncaster, South Yorkshire, and Warminster, Wiltshire, under suspicion of committing offenses under the Computer Misuse Act, an article published on Friday in The Guardian reported. The men were arrested separately, and computer equipment from a Doncaster address was confiscated for forensic examination.

“The arrests relate to our inquiries into a series of serious computer intrusions and online denial-of-service attacks recently suffered by a number of multi-national companies, public institutions and government and law enforcement agencies in Great Britain and the United States," said Detective Inspector Mark Raymond from the Metropolitan Police's Central e-Crime Unit, according to a separate article from the Associated Press.

Over the past 18 months, people claiming affiliation with Anonymous and the splinter group Lulz Security have take responsibility for breaching the security of Sony, the CIA, Britain's Serious Organized Crime Agency and multiple US law enforcement groups. The attacks continued Thursday with the reported leak of internal email and documents from 28 Texas police chiefs.

Thursday's arrests came the same day Scotland Yard charged two men with attacks also attributed to Anonymous. Christopher Weatherhead, 20, of Northampton, and Ashley Rhodes, 26, of Kennington, south London, were charged with conspiracy to carry out an unauthorized act in relation to a computer. They are scheduled to in Westminster Magistrates' Court on September 7.

Two other suspects, including 22-year-old Peter David Gibson and a 17-year-old from Chester, have already been charged in the case, which relates to denial-of-service attacks on PayPal, Amazon, MasterCard, Bank of America, and Visa in December.

The arrests are part of a trans-Atlantic crackdown on Anonymous following an 18-month hacking spree by the loosely organized griefer group. In the past few months, dozens of people in North America and Europe have been snared in the probe, including 14 people in the US and five in the UK and the Netherlands. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.