Feeds

Twitter to serve unsolicited ads in Facebook style

Crystal stream of news to be controllably polluted

Security for virtualized datacentres

Twitter is to start pushing adverts from companies which Twitter users are not following into their tweet streams, but only ones it has decided they will be interested in: so that's OK then.

At the moment, Twitter only pushes adverts into a user's stream of tweets if the Twitter user has signed up to "follow" the company placing the advert, while Facebook is apparently happy to push anything into the stream of news. But All Things D reports that Twitter is catching up and about to start pushing adverts from those it feels you might be interested in, based on your other followings and activities.

The idea is that if you're following one airline then you're probably interested in products supplied by another one. That's hardly a new idea, but as Twitter won't be explaining how it decides who is interested in what, it also provides the company with Google-like variability in the number of adverts it delivers.

Google, by default, delivers adverts on the basis of related terms as well as on terms for which the advertiser has bid, but as the Chocolate Factory decides what is "related", it is free to adjust the term to get the right number of adverts delivered.

Twitter will enjoy the same flexibility, and although the ads will only appear on the Twitter.com website (as opposed to being pushed out to those using client applications), the company will be able to deliver as many adverts as it wishes.

Facebook has been emulating Twitter's news-feed for a while now, but when it comes to pushed adverts it seems to be leading. Facebook already slips update-like adverts into ticker updates, which can't be removed or unsubscribed despite the best efforts of search-engine expert Phil Bradley.

All Things D pegs Twitter's advertising revenue at $100m this year, compared to Facebook which made something between five and 10 times that amount. That's not nearly enough to justify Twitter's $8bn valuation, so one way or another it has got to put more products in front of our eyes if its not going to make us pay for this stuff. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Bono apologises for iTunes album dump
Megalomania, generosity and FEAR of irrelevance drove group to Apple deal
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.