Feeds

Oz teachers lugging obsolete lappies

Victorian departmental lease terms under attack

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

A change to government policy in Victoria will see teachers saddled with old and discontinued laptops under a four-year lease that they have to pay for out of their own pockets.

According to Victorian assistant principal and blogger Richard Lambert, the policy change by that state’s education department not only extends the lease period from three years to four – which Lambert says will saddle teachers with obsolete kit long before they get the option to refresh – it also inexplicably has a huge difference in lease terms for machines that retail at close to the same price.

The Lenovo ($AU799 at retail, says Lambert) is leased out at just $AU4.00 a fortnight, while a white MacBook ($AU899 at retail) leases from the department at $AU11.50 a fortnight. He says the price difference is explained by the department as accounting for one replacement battery in the Mac’s lifetime (because the longer lease period is notionally longer than the battery’s spec), the need for accessories like VGA adapters to plug the units into projectors, and the need to create a new official departmental software image for the new machine.

The problem for teachers is that in the public school system in Victoria, BYO machines are verboten: only units with the department’s approved software image (and suite of applications) are allowed, and at the same time, both policy and practice strongly encourages teachers to put classroom material online and do their marking online.

In other words, Lambert told the Sydney Morning Herald, (warning: autorun video forced on visitors to Fairfax Websites) teachers are in a bind: they must lease a machine just to do their job, they have to pay for the machines themselves, but they feel they’re being railroaded to particular choices.

“I think it's becoming more and more of an issue asking someone to pay for something they can't perform their job without,” Mr Lambert said. “I don't think any other industries would get away with that,” he told the newspaper. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
Pedals and wheel in that Google robo-car or it's off the road – Cali DMV
And insists on $5 million insurance per motor against accidents
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?