Feeds

Outbound space probe looks back at tiny Earth and Moon

Space snap puts things in perspective

The Power of One Infographic

Pic NASA's space probe Juno, outward bound for Jupiter, has sent pack a pic of the Earth-Moon system from 6 million miles away.

The Earth and Moon, seen from the Juno spacecraft 6 million miles out. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

I can see the pub from here

According to NASA, Juno was further away than the Moon within a day of being launched on 5 August. Despite its speed, the craft will take another five years to reach its Jovian destination 1,740 million miles further on. The pic above was snapped using the probe's camera, known as JunoCam, as part of engineering checks by NASA ground controllers.

"This is a remarkable sight people get to see all too rarely," said Scott Bolton, top boffin on the Juno push. "This view of our planet shows how Earth looks from the outside, illustrating a special perspective of our role and place in the universe. We see a humbling yet beautiful view of ourselves."

Juno will be the first solar-powered spacecraft to go so far from the Sun: previous missions to the outer solar system have required nuclear power sources. NASA reckons that large modern solar panels, combined with a planned track that will keep Juno in sunlight at all times and avoid the worst of the radiation hazards around Jupiter, will do the trick. This is the more so as Juno has "modest" power needs, being intended to power up its instruments for only six hours of each 11-day orbit around the giant planet.

The probe, following in the recent tradition of crewing space missions with suitable toy figurines (established first in the Register's own space programme) also carries three specially-crafted aluminium Lego people (well, technically deities in two cases).

The NASA photo release is here, and there's more on Juno here. ®

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists
Researchers, advocates, health workers among those on shot-down plane
Forty-five years ago: FOOTPRINTS FOUND ON MOON
NASA won't be back any time soon, sadly
Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT
In the Lone Star State, perhaps appropriately enough
MARS NEEDS OCEANS to support life - and so do exoplanets
Just being in the Goldilocks zone doesn't mean there'll be anyone to eat the porridge
The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots
Someone needs to get that lazy star cooking again before things get cold around here
Diary note: Pluto's close-up is a year from … now!
New Horizons is less than a year from the dwarf planet
Boffins discuss AI space program at hush-hush IARPA confab
IBM, MIT, plenty of others invited to fill Uncle Sam's spy toolchest, but where's Google?
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.