Feeds

Nokia dishes out $10m in developer prizes

Finns' sparkly balls come top

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

Nokia is celebrating the fact that its Calling All Innovators competition finally brought in a majority of US developers, even if the grand winners were both from Finland.

Those two winning entries were: a game involving sparking orbs, called Sparkle, and a picture-filtering application called ShutterPro. These entries each win $250,000. The winners of the other 15 categories have to make do with $150,000 apiece, while assorted cash prizes and promotional opportunities are distributed to the lower ranks.

In the Ovi store, Sparkle proudly claims to be "[a] premium gaming experience exclusively for the new Symbian^3 smartphones", which is surprising when the title is also available for Windows, Mac, iOS, Bada and even WebOS. No doubt they're working on a Blackberry version too, but exclusivity wasn't a requirement for the competition, which was judged on Ovi download rate as well as the usual criteria.

Previous competitions have seen precious little innovation, with the winners being ports and pre-installed apps, but this year there is some genuine innovation in there. Check out the winner of the Social Media category, Different Tack, for something really new.

Nokia is very pleased to have attracted so many US developers, even if it gave the two top prizes to Finns, and the two runner-up prizes were dished out to Canadians. Americans won the majority of category prizes, and Nokia held the awards in Sunnyvale, California: showing how US-friendly it is.

Nokia tells us it is also delighted to see so many entries written in Qt. Qt has been Nokia's preferred development platform for while, as it compiles across Symbian and MeeGo devices, which would be top if only either of them had a future.

Across all the winners, and categories, there are prizes that (we're told) total $10m across the board. The majority of that is in promotional opportunities, training and suchlike, but there's a good deal of cash being handed over too, though it seems strange to reward success (in downloads) with more success (in prize money) when surely the most popular applications are those that least need the money to spur more development. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.