Feeds

Docs and devs: Health secretary wants healthcare apps

Death, taxes and nurses

The essential guide to IT transformation

Health secretary Andrew Lansley has launched a call for new ideas for health apps to help patients make informed decisions about their care.

The invitation is open to healthcare professionals and app developers. Lansley cited an existing example of what could be done, the Choosing Well app developed by NHS Yorkshire and Humber which enables people to search for their nearest NHS services.

The Department of Health said any ideas, which can also extend to online maps, should relate to one of five themes: personalisation and choice of care and support; better health and care outcomes; autonomy and accountability; improving public health; and improving long term care and support.

A spokeswoman for the department said: "We will not be announcing any funding for the development of the best health apps. We want to promote the best apps that people tell us work for them, and envisage that app developers and the technology industry want to develop the best ideas."

Lansley also asked people to name their favourite existing health applications. Ideas can be submitted at www.mapsandapps.dh.gov.uk.

"We want to give people better access to information that will put them in control of their health and help make informed choices about their healthcare," Lansley said.

"Over the next six weeks, we want to hear from patients, health professionals and budding app developers on their ideal new app. This is a unique opportunity for the NHS and those who develop apps to not only showcase their work but bring to life new ideas and realise true innovation in healthcare."

The ideas will be judged by a panel including Sir Bruce Keogh, NHS medical director, Dr Shibal Roy, investigator at the National Institute for Health Research; Jennie Ritchie-Campbell, director of cancer services innovation at Macmillan Cancer Support; and Julie Meyer, a judge on TV programme Dragon's Den. They will chose a group of apps to be showcased at an event during the autumn.

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain
Told to cough up more details as antitrust probe goes deeper
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.