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Nexsan stuffs its box with Tosh flash

Opens dressing-gown to reveal 13,800 IOPS/watt bulge

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Nexsan's E5000 flash-accelerated NAS box uses new Tosh flash.

The Toshiba MKz001GZB is a 100GB, 2.5-inch SSD that uses 32nm process single level cell flash to deliver 90,000 random read IOPS, 17,400 random write ones, 500MB/sec sequential read bandwidth and 250MB/sec sequential write speed. It has a SAS 6Gbit/s interface and is virtually identical in performance to the similarly specified MKx001GRZB announced last December, except it writes randomly and reads sequentially a little slower, and writes sequentially a little faster. This GRZB variant is dual-ported.

Toshiba and Nexsan issued a joint release on the kit. Like the MKx001GRZB, the GZB uses around 6.5 watts and Tosh claims it provides 13,800 IOPS/watt, which is "industry-leading".

As a hard disk drive vendor, Toshiba may become a bigger player in the flash market than it is in the disk drive market as it owns fabs with SanDisk. Neither Seagate nor Western Digital own flash fabs and so Tosh has a vertical integration advantage over them in flash. ®

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