Feeds

Popular Android modder takes job with Samsung Mobile

Cyanogen to make Android 'more awesome'

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The creator of one of the most popular Android modification kits has taken a job as a software engineer with Samsung's mobile device unit.

Steve Kondik, the hobbyist hacker behind CyanogenMod software, confirmed the appointment with Samsung Mobile on his Facebook page and to several bloggers.

“I will be working on making Android more awesome,” he told AndroidandMe.

In a dispatch to AndroidGuys, Kondik indicated he had no plans to step away from CyanogenMod:

... it's a job and I'm glad that I can use what I learned from all this to do something cool in the real world :) I'll still be doing code review and some leadership for CM, but I'll be keeping it legit like always. ... I think we really broke away from the modding community. Most of us are professional engineers or in the field some way or another.

CyanogenMod users have long lavished praise on the aftermarket ROM, which enhances stock Android configurations with custom apps and features, including VPN support, wireless tethering, and CPU overclocking. It works with 40 different Android devices, and boasts more than 500,000 installations.

One of the chief complaints from Android users is the considerable time it takes for many carriers to offer updates for the Google operating system. It wasn't supposed to be this way. One of the key advantages of Android is its openness, since the source code is available for anyone to see and modify. So it seems especially cruel that users with contracts from Verizon and other providers are forced to use woefully out-of-date Android versions unless they customize their devices using CyanogenMod or other kits.

With Google's purchase of Motorola's mobile division for a whopping $12.5bn, competing manufacturers are scrambling to find ways to remain relevant. Kondik's proven track record in creating popular homebrew tweaks and enhancements, assuming it's used wisely, can only help Samsung differentiate itself from the rest of the crowd. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease
Hey, c'mon Choc Factory, it's our 'right to be forgotten'
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.