Feeds

Popular Android modder takes job with Samsung Mobile

Cyanogen to make Android 'more awesome'

High performance access to file storage

The creator of one of the most popular Android modification kits has taken a job as a software engineer with Samsung's mobile device unit.

Steve Kondik, the hobbyist hacker behind CyanogenMod software, confirmed the appointment with Samsung Mobile on his Facebook page and to several bloggers.

“I will be working on making Android more awesome,” he told AndroidandMe.

In a dispatch to AndroidGuys, Kondik indicated he had no plans to step away from CyanogenMod:

... it's a job and I'm glad that I can use what I learned from all this to do something cool in the real world :) I'll still be doing code review and some leadership for CM, but I'll be keeping it legit like always. ... I think we really broke away from the modding community. Most of us are professional engineers or in the field some way or another.

CyanogenMod users have long lavished praise on the aftermarket ROM, which enhances stock Android configurations with custom apps and features, including VPN support, wireless tethering, and CPU overclocking. It works with 40 different Android devices, and boasts more than 500,000 installations.

One of the chief complaints from Android users is the considerable time it takes for many carriers to offer updates for the Google operating system. It wasn't supposed to be this way. One of the key advantages of Android is its openness, since the source code is available for anyone to see and modify. So it seems especially cruel that users with contracts from Verizon and other providers are forced to use woefully out-of-date Android versions unless they customize their devices using CyanogenMod or other kits.

With Google's purchase of Motorola's mobile division for a whopping $12.5bn, competing manufacturers are scrambling to find ways to remain relevant. Kondik's proven track record in creating popular homebrew tweaks and enhancements, assuming it's used wisely, can only help Samsung differentiate itself from the rest of the crowd. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T dangles gigabit broadband plans over 100 US cities
So soon after a mulled Google Fiber expansion, fancy that
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
Turnbull gave NBN Co NO RULES to plan blackspot upgrades
NBN Co faces huge future Telstra bills and reduces fibre footprint
NBN Co plans fibre-to-the-basement blitz to beat cherry-pickers
Heading off at the pass operation given same priority as blackspot fixing
NBN Co in 'broadband kit we tested worked' STUNNER
Announcement of VDSL trial is not proof of concept for fibre-to-the-node
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.