Feeds

Dell puts gun to Streak 5 tablet, pulls trigger

Five-inch experiment dead

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Dell has discontinued its five-inch Dell Streak, a neither-fish-nor-fowl item that never quite caused consumers' pulses to pound.

The death of the Streak 5 was announced on Dell's website on Thursday, along with the suggestion that streakers "Check out our other innovative Dell tablets and smartphones," including the Android 2.2 Streak 7 tablet and Venue smartphone, Windows Phone 7 Venue Pro smartphone, and Windows 7 Home Premium Inspiron Duo convertible.

Dell's webpage announcing the end of the five-inch Streak

"It's been a great ride," you say? Well, not really

The Streak 5 was an odd bird: both a scrunched tablet and an expansively screened GSM smartphone. Released in June 2010 running Android 1.6, aka Donut, it was upgraded to version 2.2, Froyo, later that year.

When The Reg reviewed the five-incher shortly after its release, we called it "much more of a supersized Android smartphone than a real tablet." We were right. The Streak 5, though quite serviceable in some ways, was positioned between tablets and smartphones, and fell into that void.

Five-inch Dell Streak

An oversized phone or an undersized tablet?

Not that Dell should be excoriated for a poor marketing decision. Instead, they should be patted on the back for taking a chance. When the Streak 5 was introduced, the current tablet champ, Apple's iPad, had just been released, and – despite what Steve Jobs may have said – no one was really sure what form factor would become a success in the then-nascent tablet marketplace.

We now know that five inches didn't cut it for most consumers – but hindsight, as they say, is always 20/20.

The end of the Streak 5 doesn't mean that Dell is abandoning its foray into the tablet market, of course. It still offers the Streak 7, and the Streak 10 is due soon, although it'll make its debut in China.

The Android-based tablet market is in a bit of disarray at the moment, what with Google reneging on its earlier promise to open source version 3.0, aka Honeycomb, and with the next version, Ice Cream Sandwich, not due until later this year.

And then there's the iPad juggernaught, just a-rollin' along. Despite today's news from ABI Research that all Android tablets taken together now have a 20 per cent share of that market, Apple's 80 per cent is ... hmm, let's see ... four times as big.

If that Android's market share is going to rise – and the history of smartphones indicates that it should – one thing is clear: five-inch tablets won't be a factor in that growth. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?