Feeds

Red Hat dev cloud welcomes Java EE 6

JBoss floated to 10,000 feet

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Red Hat has announced that its OpenShift developer cloud now handles Java Enterprise Edition 6, boasting that this is the first "platform-as-as-service" to do so.

An online service for building, hosting, and readily-scaling applications, OpenShift is akin to Google App Engine, Microsoft Azure, and Cloud Foundry, the new open source offering from Red Hat-arch-rival VMware. Uncloaked this past May, Red Hat's service runs atop Amazon's EC2 infrastructure cloud, and it's available in two different forms: the free OpenShift Express and the beefier OpenShift Flex, which is available as a free trial but eventually requires fees for Amazon usage.

OpenShift handles Java EE 6 by way of Red Hat's JBoss Application Server 7, which serves as the basis for the company's JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 6, due for official release next year. When OpenShift first launched, its Flex incarnation used JBoss Application Server 6, the previous version. JBoss Application Server 7 is now running on both OpenShift Express and OpenShift Flex.

"This is not only the first real enterprise PaaS, but it's the first one that is EE6 compliant!" wrties JBoss community man Mark Little. "I've been developing on it for weeks and the first thing you notice compared to some other PaaS implementations is the boot time: it's so quick that deploying on to OpenShift is almost as quick as deploying locally! (OK, network speeds notwithstanding.)"

In a video here, RedHat takes an application built with Eclipse, deploys it to a local JBoss app server, and then deploys the same WAR file to OpenShift.

With JBoss Application Server 7 and Java EE 6 in place, the service also welcomes Java Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI, aka JSR-299), a new Java EE 6 programming model designed to make app development less restrictive. "Content and Dependency Injection...picks up where Spring started getting a little crusty," writes Red Hat "PaaS Master" Issac Roth.

"It's more then a framework, it's a rich programming model. CDI makes Java application development less restrictive and is much more extensible compared to Spring. In terms of developer productivity, it leap frogs some of the earlier frameworks and it's an open standard."

But if you prefer Spring, OpenShift can run Spring as well. It also handles Ruby, Python, Perl, and PHP, and it plays with MySQL, SQLite, MongoDB, MemBase, and Memcache. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Cutting cancer rates: Data, models and a happy ending?
How surgery might be making cancer prognoses worse
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?