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Dunkin' Donuts waitress offers additional dunkin'

'Extra sugar' on the menu at New Jersey eatery

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A 29-year-old Dunkin' Donuts night shift waitress has been cuffed for offering clients a bit of additional dunkin', according to New Jersey's Daily Record.

Melissa Redmond allegedly converted the fast food outlet on Route 46 outside NYC into a veritable knocking shop during her 9pm to 5am night shift, nipping to customers' vehicles to earn a bit of extra cash during breaks from serving at the drive-thru window.

Detective Sergeant Kyle Schwarzmann explained how a concerned citizen blew the lid on the moonlighting hussy: "I had gotten an anonymous tip. She was a night-time employee, supposedly a very good one."

As befits the seriousness of the offence, Schwarzmann launched an intensive surveillance operation on Redmond, codenamed "Operation Extra Sugar". He noticed "on multiple evenings that she would go out to cars to see customers and would spend 10 or 15 minutes there".

Schwarzmann added: "Sometimes I'd even see money changing hands."

The detective then brought in back-up, with Officer Scott Haigh playing the role of eager punter. Schwarzmann said: "He went in plain clothes through the drive-thru window. He spoke to her and she said if he wanted a good time to call her and she gave him her phone number."

Haigh returned at a later date, was offered another menu of treats at a "new, and lower, price", but said he had to go and get some cash. When he got back, he and Redmond drove round the back of the Dunkin Donuts where the drive-thru harlot was cuffed.

She was subsequently "processed, served her complaint and released", and is facing prostitution charges.

This alternative report into the Route 46 strumpet sting notes the outrage has not dented Dunkin' Donuts share price following a 27 July IPO at $19 dollars a share. The share value has already leapt 40 per cent, "with investors giddy over the chain's plans to expand throughout the West Coast and a record of competing successfully against Starbucks". ®

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