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Anonymous and LulzSec spew out largest ever police data dump

Hacktivists run wild in global revenge hacks

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Hacktivists have released a huge cache of stolen data from US law enforcement agencies as revenge for the arrest of alleged members of LulzSec and Anonymous.

The 10GB data dump covered personal information, email addresses, social security numbers, and credit card details swiped from an online sheriff's store. The batch also covered data on informants.

The information covered 76 law enforcement websites in 11 states, most reportedly hosted by the same firm, Arkansas-based Brooks-Jeffrey Marketing.

The hack was carried out on 31 July by members of AntiSec – an ongoing operation run by Anonymous and spin-off hacker group LulzSec. A sample of social security numbers of over 100 police officers from the Missouri Sheriffs' Association website was released at the time. Now the hacktivists have upped the ante with the release of what appears the be the whole batch of 10GB, the biggest ever release of data.

Hacktivists across the globe pitched in across the weekend. For example, LulzSec Brazil reportedly leaked 8GB of Federal Police Data.

Meanwhile, in response to threats from the government of Ecuador, Anonymous releases personal data (names, ID numbers, dates of birth etc) on 45,000 local police officers.

In addition, the The official website of the Syrian Ministry of Defense was attacked and defaced by members of Anonymous. The hack was a protest at the Middle Eastern state's ongoing, bloody crackdown on anti-government protests.

Finally the Twitter account of the Minister of the Interior and Justice of Colombia was hacked.

The mayhem and mischief is set to continue for the rest of the summer, at least. Digital chatter suggests that TeaMp0isoN and Anonymous have agreed to participate in some form of "digital activism" that's said to be unrelated to hacking. TeaMp0isoN is another hacktivist group best known for a hack on the English Defence League website back in February. ®

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