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AMD slips into desktop RAM biz

Memory gets its Radeon

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AMD is entering the desktop RAM market, according to a new page on its website.

A new "Systems Memory" page on the AMD website indicates that the company will soon be offering DDR3 modules under the existing Radeon brand, which it acquired with the purchase of ATI in 2006 and previously used for GPUs.

"AMD Radeon DDR3 System Modules are ideally suited to our CPU and APU products," the page reads (rather predictably). "Components are tested to the highest industry standards on AMD platforms to guarantee reliability and performance."

AMD did not immediately respond to a request for comment. It's unclear whether or not the memory modules are manufactured by AMD.

According to the company's site, the modules come in three flavors: "entertainment", "ultra pro gaming", and "enterprise". All are 2GB modules, and all use a 1.5 volt power supply, but speeds vary. The entertainment series is listed at 1333MHz and the gaming series is listed at 1600MHz, while the enterprise series is marked "TBA". The entertainment series uses 9-9-9 timing, while the gaming series uses 11-11-11.

According to Akiba PC Hotline, AMD's system memory modules have already gone on sale in Japan.

AMD already offers Radeon-branded memory for graphics cards and its various "all-in-board" (AIB) partners, but this is very different from offering systems memory through retail. Some speculate that AMD is merely trying to off-load some excess inventory, but it seems clear that the company is intent on entering a new market. ®

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