Feeds

TV goes home, even when mobile

Take one screen into the living room?

Security for virtualized datacentres

Mobile video consumption is far from mobile, if the latest US survey is to be believed, with three-quarters of video consumption taking place within the home.

The survey comes from Nielsen, and was commissioned by the Cable & Telecommunications Association for Marketing (CTAM) to see if portable video is driving viewers away from TV. Turns out it isn't: they're just consuming multiple video streams at the same time, which is still bad news for the advertisers.

The survey questioned almost 1,500 mobile video users, 63 per cent of whom said they'd be a lot less interested if they had to pay for the content. But those questioned also said that despite consuming video on their phones, and tablets, they still watched the same quantity of TV – which begs the question of how they find the time.

The suggestion is that viewers are turning to their devices for entertainment during the ad breaks, watching a YouTube video or two while the big screen is trying to sell them stuff. That's good news for Google, but bad news from the TV advertisers who are losing the eyeballs they need to pay for the programmes.

The CTAM points to cross-platform content as a possible solution. Sync-to-TV is the flavour of the month right now: mobile apps which use the device microphone to present content synchronised to what's happening on TV (even if the TV show is recorded or a repeat). The CTAM reckons users love the duel-screen experience, and it keeps them loyal during the advert breaks too.

The preponderance of home use mirrors what European operators found when testing mobile broadcast TV. Trials in the UK and Italy found that more than 30 per cent of the viewing was done in the home, less the the US study but this was broadcast programmes rather than YouTube clips. Those figures were attributed to children watching video in their rooms, and partners watching in bed.

Nielsen also found more than half of its respondents were watching mobile video in the car, though that figures drops to 31 per cent for tablets – perhaps because they're harder to balance on the steering wheel. Given the predominance of single-occupancy cars in the US we're guessing this is mostly children again, watching from the back seat.

Similarly low figures apply for video watched while commuting, in contrast to Japan which had mobile video early and considers commuters to be a significant market – though the dominance of public transport is probably more important there.

The fact that so much video is consumed in the home is important for network operators, who can see their traffic offloaded to Wi-Fi networks or femtocells. But they'll have to use the latter if they want to keep control over (and make money out of) what their customers are watching. ®

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Turnbull: NBN won't turn your town into Silicon Valley
'People have been brainwashed to believe that their world will be changed forever if they get FTTP'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.