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iPhone 5 now set for October launch

Rumour discredits rumours

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With such an influx of rumours over the iPhone 5's projected release this September, we've practically accepted it as fact. Apparently, we're all wrong though, as the company actually plans to launch its next-gen iPhone in October.

That's according to an insider who spoke with AllthingsD and insisted there would be no September joy for Apple fanboys. Although he failed to give an exact date, the site says other sources claimed we're looking towards the end of the month on that front.

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The insider in question was hitting out against this morning's reports that American outlet AT&T had banned employee vacations during the last two weeks of September in preparation of the iPhone release.

"I don’t know why AT&T’s calling for all hands on deck those weeks, but it’s not for an iPhone launch," he said, before going on to quote October as the actual month of release.

There you have it folks - don't get your hopes up just yet. It seems there could still be quite a wait on the cards and a lot more from the rumour mill to come in the meantime. ®

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