Feeds

NotW 'targeted' phone of Sarah Payne's mum

Bent PI had number of Brooks-given blower, says report

New hybrid storage solutions

The mother of murdered eight-year-old girl Sarah Payne reportedly had her mobile phone targeted by the News of the World's private investigator Glen Mulcaire.

Ex-News International boss Rebekah Brooks, who edited the Sunday tabloid between 2000 and 2003, has repeatedly championed Sarah's Law, a scheme that allows parents to check if someone with regular access to their children has a history of child sex offences.

Since illegal voicemail interception allegations against the News Corp-owned company re-appeared to eventually engulf the NotW, which was shuttered earlier this month, Brooks has repeatedly stood by the paper's campaign on Sarah's Law and counts it as a personal achievement during her editorship at the tabloid.

According to the Guardian, police officers working on Scotland Yard's Operation Weeting investigation uncovered Mulcaire's notes containing personal details about Sara Payne, bereaved mother of Sarah Payne, the girl who was abducted and later killed in 2000.

It's understood Payne learned of the discovery on Tuesday. Friends of hers told the Guardian that she was "absolutely devastated and deeply disappointed" by the revelation.

Payne originally thought her phone had not been hacked by anyone working at the now-defunct tabloid and wrote a farewell column for the final edition of the NotW, thanking the staff there for their support.

A phone said to have been given to Payne by Brooks as a gift to help her stay in touch with supporters of Sarah's Law is understood to be the one targeted by Mulcaire.

Labour MP Tom Watson, who recently grilled Murdoch, his son James and Brooks at a select committee hearing into the phone-hacking scandal, described the latest disclosure as "a new low."

The discovery by police investigating illegal voicemail allegations at the NotW follows shocking revelations about murder victim Milly Dowler, whose phone was allegedly hacked and messages deleted while police were still searching for the teenager. The erasure of the messages gave Milly's family false hope that she might still be alive. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.