Feeds

Aussie ALDI withdraws infected greybox offering

Multifunction hard drives hotching with Conficker

SANS - Survey on application security programs

The Australian branch of supermarket chain ALDI has withdrawn a range of hard drives from its stores following the discovery that the hardware was infected with malware.

The affected device – a grey-label external 4-in-1 hard drive, DVD, USB and card reader device – has reportedly been pulled from shelves, though it is still listed on Aldi's website.

The product recall follows the discovery of components of the infamous Conficker on examples of the kit sold in Queensland, according to an alert by Australia's Computer Emergency Response Team (AusCERT) issued on Thursday.

The Conficker worm first appeared in November 2008, causing all sorts of disruption because of its aggressive spreading techniques. Victims included Australian banking and transport operations.

The malware was probably introduced to the 4-in-1 hard drive by infected machines in the factory producing the kit. Mishaps of this type are by no means unusual. Previous examples include IBM distributing pre-infected USB keys, pre-infected Android phones from Vodafone Spain and pre-infected PCs from Aldi. The latter mishap, which dates back to 2007, involved the Angelina boot-sector virus, as explained in a blog post by Sophos from the time here. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.