Feeds

Ubisoft revisits Internet-at-all-times DRM

Drive away the pirates

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Ubisoft has revealed that in order to play its forthcoming title Driver: San Francisco on a PC, users will require a permanent internet connection.

The news was Tweeted by a Ubisoft community developer, who in response to a Driver related query, simply stated "PC version requires permanent Internet connection."

This is corroborated by information on Steam's pre-order page, effectively saying the same thing.

Driver: San Francisco

The move would see the return of a digital rights management system that had previously caused public outcry. Ubisoft tried it with Settlers 7, as well as Assassin's Creed 2, before changing the system for its follow-up, AC: Brotherhood, where Internet was only required to validate the install.

Now the full-DRM is back - at least for PC - in a bid to keep piracy subdued.

Even those with strong internet signals have problems from time to time, so surely the playability of a game shouldn't depend on the reliability of t'interweb?

Driver: San Francisco is out this September. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.