Feeds

Koreans produce $3m glow-in-the-dark dog

Effulgent blacklight beagle can be switched on and off

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

It's been five long years since Taiwanese boffins brewed up a glow-in-the-dark pig, but one Reg reader's prayers* for the ultimate pet have finally appear to have been answered in the form of a fluorescent mutt.

According to Reuters, a Seoul National University team led by Lee Byeong-chun has sucessfully bred a GM beagle female called Tegon, using the same somatic cell nuclear transfer tech which was deployed to create the world's first cloned dog, Snuppy, back in 2005.

Lee Byeong-chun is the man who in 2009 claimed to have bred a quartet of self-illuminating beagles, but Tegon takes luminous canine tech to a whole new level.

Rather brilliantly, Tegon can be turned on and off like a bedside lamp. By adding a doxycycline antibiotic to her food, she'll "glow fluorescent green under ultraviolet light".

The Seoul National University team is, of course, claiming that their research has benefits beyond that of offering dog-lovers the mutts' nuts of novelty breeds. Lead researcher Lee Byeong-chun said: "The creation of Tegon opens new horizons, since the gene injected to make the dog glow can be substituted with genes that trigger fatal human diseases."

Reuters elaborates that "there are 268 illnesses that humans and dogs have in common, creating dogs that artificially show such symptoms could aid treatment methods for diseases that afflict humans".

Readers wishing to acquire a switchable fluorescent dog should note that they don't come cheap – Tegon cost $3m to develop, and then you've got to factor in the cost of inoculations, worm tablets, and doxycycline every time you want to impress your dinner guests.

The Tegon research is published in the journal Genesis. ®

Bootnote

*Andy Bright wrote:

I suppose all the animal rights do-gooders will oppose me on this, but I think they should shift their attention from pigs to dogs.

As a marketable product, the pig is not really up there with plasma TVs or nextgen game consoles – but a glow-in-the-dark dog would be massive.

In fact I want one, bad enough to quit my job and cash out my pension to get one.

Maybe my wife and kids wouldn't appreciate the importance of such a purchase, especially when we're made homeless from the ensuing foreclosure, but in bragging rights, this would be right up there with owning a flying car.

Screw finding cures to diseases or other such twaddle, I want a glow-in-the-dark dog.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
SCREW YOU, Russia! NASA lobs $6.8bn at Boeing AND SpaceX to run space station taxis
Musk charging nearly half as much as Boeing for crew trips
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
India's MOM Mars mission makes final course correction
Mangalyaan probe will feel the burn of orbital insertion on September 24th
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.