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'Evil' Aussie hacker 'named', refused bail

Infrastructure screwed by hacking trucker

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The unemployed truck driver allegedly behind some of Australia's most aggressive corporate network hacking attacks in recent months has been refused bail after being charged with 49 counts of accessing restricted data and one count of an unauthorised change of data.

David Cecil, a 25 year old from Cowra, is alleged to be the hacker commonly known as "evil".

Prosecutors claimed in the Orange Local Court, in New South Wales, that Cecil had unlawfully gained access and control of the entire system of ISP Platfom Networks for six weeks.

The Court registrar accepted prosecutors' claims that Cecil could destroy evidence if granted bail, and remanded him in custody to appear in the same court on Friday.

It has also been claimed that Cecil was behind the crippling hacking attack on DistributeIT last month.

That attack not only disrupted the business operations of thousands of SMEs but resulted in the loss of 4,000 websites from four servers deemed “unrecoverable” by previous DistributeIT management.

Web hosting company Netregistry took over the customers of the distressed company after the attack and revealed in a blog post that it has assisted police in their investigation into the hack.

“We call on “Evil” to apologise to all the businesses he ruined as a result of the targeted hacking attack,” Netregistry said.

Netregistry has successfully migrated all DistributeIT’s services into its infrastructure, under the brand TPP Wholesale. The company reports that in the last month, its customer service team has manually responded to over 17,000 separate support enquiries to resolve outstanding issues for affected customers. ®

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