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Chinese lecturer demands his students acquire iPads

Slab-fondling kids forced to wear suits, makeup in class

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A Chinese lecturer has raised a storm by demanding students get an iPad, and that anyone unable to raise the funds over the summer shouldn't bother studying the financial industry.

Liang Zhenyu teaches at the Shanghai Maritime University and sent out a tweet (over the Weibo service) explaining that he would be using an iPad for all lessons, handouts and exam material, and that next term's students should get themselves busy over the summer and earn the requisite cash.

His strongly-worded recommendation, translated by MIC Gadget, explains that if you can't raise the money then you should consider an alternative career as financial services might not be the best subject for you.

"I hope every student would go to purchase an iPad, because iPad represents the most modern thinking, and my students must like that. If you don't have money to buy one, then you go to earn money. If you cannot earn merely $4000 Yuan (around $615) within the holiday, then you are not suited to this course, and you are not necessary [sic] to be my student."

Zhenyu also reckons students should wear suits and females don light makeup, which seems to have provoked as much bilious feedback as the suggestion that everyone be equipped with a Cupertino fondleslab.

Justifying himself in postings to his blog, the lecturer explains that he's trying to teach students how to survive in the business world, and that the ability to maintain a smart appearance is a useful skill – an argument with which, sadly, its hard to find fault.

But when it comes to the iPad he's clearly enraptured by the Jobsian dream:

"[The] iPad is not an innovation, it's revolution ... without it the teaching process will be paralyzed."

The lengthy blog posting (in Chinese) lists some of the great things one can do on an iPad, but concedes that students could probably get by with a PC if they really wanted, as well as pointing out that Zhenyu applies his high standards to himself as well as his students:

"I always wear shirts, suits, handkerchief to work, never wear a sweater, without exception ... I myself, if I'm late for class, even if late for a minute, I will [do] self-punishment in front of the classroom ... 50 push-ups."

Thinking back to our university days, we relish the idea of our lecturers doing 50 press-ups, though suspect such a trial would leave very little time for teaching, even if we had been equipped with iPads. ®

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