Feeds

TSA to revise nudie scanner software

Security theatre gets a ‘G’ rating

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

America’s Transport Security Administration has decided it doesn’t need full nude outlines to work out whether or not someone is carrying a bomb under their clothing.

Since their introduction, the voyeuristic millimeter-wave scanners have been defended by the TSA as indispensable, in spite of failing to detect guns in tests, and triggering outrage at the detail revealed by the devices.

Example imagery produced by AIT millimetre wave airport scanner. Credit: TSA

Nudie scans on the way out

Others have criticized the scanners as unnecessarily irradiating both travelers and their operators.

According to the Washington Post, the TSA has bowed, at least on the matter of privacy. Instead of projecting the target’s victim’s traveller’s scanned body image on the operator’s screen, the administration is rolling out new software that will display a generic human outline identifying any concealed objects it discovers.

Lapsing into the jargon of someone terminally-infected by the managerial virus, TSA administrator John Pistole said the new software will maintain security “while improving the passenger experience at checkpoints”.

The new software is, according to the Washington Post, a response to a “vocal minority of Americans”. It adds that those triggering an alert, along with those who refuse scanning, will still get a TSA groping pat-down (including, we presume, grandmothers and children).

The software has undergone a six-month test, and will now be installed at the 41 airports using the scanners. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.