Feeds

Apple Mac OS X 10.7 Lion Part One

The mane event?

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Review There was a time when I’d be excited about the launch of a new version of Apple’s Mac operating system. I’d count the days leading up to the launch with the same fervour as opening the windows on a yuletide advent calendar.

Apple Mac OS X 10.7 Lion

Installing the big cat

The day of arrival was never a disappointment. The drama of it all – breaking open the wholly unnecessary white box, wasting half a day on the installation, playing with animated onscreen bits that pop up or slide about, copying files from drive to drive simply to watch the new progress bars – was worth the trouble of half my old software not working properly any more.

But at some point, I became a humourless old git who finds these upgrades tiresome. And I can pinpoint exactly when this change occurred. It was this week, while I was testing OS X Lion immediately prior to, during and after its launch.

For the best all-round upgrade experience, I installed Mac OS X Lion on two Intel Core i7-based computers: a borrowed 17in 2.2GHz MacBook Pro notebook and my own 27in 2.8GHz iMac desktop machine.

Apple Mac OS X 10.7 Lion

Meaningless gestures: Double-tap to zoom? Not on my Mac, it doesn’t

After manually installing the operating system over a clean copy of OS X Snow Leopard on the MacBook Pro, things were looking good. Apple has taken some clever ideas from its iOS 4 operating system for phones and tablets and reworked them for its big computers, and these are just the ticket for notebooks. In particular, the expanded variety of multi-touch trackpad gestures are very welcome, such as sliding different numbers of fingers left and right to flit back and forth between web pages, workspaces or full-screen apps feels empowering.

A three-fingered upward flick opens the new Mission Control view of all your running programs. A three-fingered downward flick opens Exposé to sort out windows in the current program. Spring open your fingers to make all the windows fly away, revealing the Desktop. Scrunch your fingers together to call up the new LaunchPad view of the programs installed on your computer. It’s marvellous stuff and helps make up for the difficulty in navigating a computer using a trackpad.

Apple Mac OS X 10.7 Lion

Mission Control does not appear with a two-fingered double-tap, despite what it says here
By the way, do you like the new Mouse Battery Level? Yesterday, it read ‘100%’

However, on turning to my sedentary iMac, I discover that most of these clever tricks are unavailable for the multi-touch MagicMouse. Some that are supposed to, don’t: no end of double-tapping with two fingers would persuade Mission Control to show its face [it works for us, Ali - Ed]. There’s even a gesture that I couldn’t get working on either computer. According to the Mouse and TrackPad System Preferences, I ought to be able to double-click on a window to zoom in, like you would on an iPhone or iPad. The problem is that double-clicking already has a function: it selects things such as text, and insists on doing so without fail.

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Next page: Out to launch

More from The Register

next story
Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then
It CANNA do it, captain.They DON'T have the POWER!
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Post-Microsoft, post-PC programming: The portable REVOLUTION
Code jockeys: count up and grab your fabulous tablets
Twitter App Graph exposes smartphone spyware feature
You don't want everyone to compile app lists from your fondleware? BAD LUCK
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

Free virtual appliance for wire data analytics
The ExtraHop Discovery Edition is a free virtual appliance will help you to discover the performance of your applications across the network, web, VDI, database, and storage tiers.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.