Feeds

Marketer taps browser flaw to see if you're pregnant

A gaffe of Epic proportions

Boost IT visibility and business value

A prominent online marketer that helps websites deliver targeted ads has been exploiting a decade-old browser flaw that leaks the history of websites that users visit, a researcher from Stanford University reported.

Epic Marketplace doesn't use the well-documented browser history leak to track specific websites a user has clicked on, Stanford graduate student Jonathan Mayer said. But it does employ advanced code that tests thousands of visited links per second to compile visitors' interests, including home improvement, pregnancy and fertility, and the repair of bad credit, he said.

Mayer's findings are based on Epic-supplied JavaScript found on websites for online movie service Flixter and cable and internet service provider Charter.net. The code, he said, works behind the scenes and is able to process thousands of URLs per second. If a user exits the browser or visits a new site before the script is done, a browser cookie stores the progress so the search may be resumed at a later time.

The report comes eight months after researchers from the University of California at San Diego caught YouPorn.com and 45 other sites pilfering visitors' surfing habits, including whether they had recently browsed to PornHub.com and other smut sites. The operator of YouPorn and Interclick, one of the ad-serving companies exposed by the researchers, have since been sued over the practice.

Until recently, a privacy weakness built into virtually every browser made it trivial for websites to compile detailed lists of websites viewed by their visitors. The sniffing technique worked by analyzing the color of links browsers use to show which URLs a user has already clicked on. Mozilla Firefox was the first major browser to plug the leak. All other major browser makers have since followed suit.

About half the world's browser users remain vulnerable to history sniffing because they haven't upgraded to a fixed version, Mayer said.

An Epic Marketplace spokesman said in an email: "The company compiles broad interest segments, but not related to sensitive categories or sites." He didn't respond to a follow up question asking if interests such as pregnancy and bad credit were tracked. Epic has also posted a response to Mayer's report here.

This article was updated to correct information about Internet Explorer.

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft: We plan to CLEAN UP this here Windows Store town
Paid-for apps that provide free downloads? Really
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Hear ye, young cyber warriors of the realm: GCHQ wants you
Get involved, get a job and then never discuss work ever again
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?