Feeds

AGs mull fate of hard-core gaming in Oz

Canberra could be R18+ gamer haven

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

Australia’s gaming industry may be rewarded with a more sophisticated classification system following a meeting with state and territory attorneys-generals today in Adelaide.

The prolonged discussions over changes to gaming classification are causing agitation within the industry, which is forced to ban games tagged with a rating higher than MA15+, and state governments, who are frustrated at the national impasse.

Under present legislation, an R18+ classification for computer games can be introduced only with the agreement of all Commonwealth, State and Territory ministers.

ACT Attorney-General Simon Corbell said today that he is investigating the introduction of an R18+ rating for games in the nation’s capital, should a national agreement fail to be negotiated.

Corbell has been a strong advocate for reform in this area and is strongly pushing for a ratings system that is consistent with international standards.

A spokesman for the ACT Attorney-General’s office told The Register that its would not be as easy as simply passing a law to get an R18+ classification in place. “We need to go through a number of channels through the Commonwealth to investigate our options,” he said. It would also be timely exercise.

"The (R18+) rating will bring computer games into line with film and literature in Australia and will give guidance to parents and young people about the suitability or otherwise of the material. It will also help address the black market that exists in the R18+ material," Corbell said. A number of states such as Tasmania have already backed the plan, but others are yet to confirm their stance.

The Federal Government announced in March that it would review the National Classification Scheme for the first time in 20 years. ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.