Feeds
60%
Air Conflicts: Secret Wars

Air Conflicts: Secret Wars

Wing men

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Review In recent years aerial combat games have been in free fall. The genre stalled after the seminal Il-2 Sturmovick and has struggled to pull out of a seemingly irrecoverable nosedive. But, contrary to their dubious quality, the continuing popularity of the Ace Combat and Hawx series proves interest remains sky high for the genre.

Air Conflicts: Secret Wars

Red sky at flight

With no sign of Hawx 3 on the horizon, and with Ace Combat: Assault Horizon not expected until October, the skies are clear for Air Conflicts: Secret Wars to gain temporary air supremacy. Essentially an update of Slovakian developer 3DIVISION's five-year old PC title Air Conflicts, Secret Wars is a WWII arcade-style dogfighter in which you play as Dorothy 'DeeDee' Derbec, a pilot for hire embroiled in the European Theatre of the global conflict.

Told through comic-book cutscenes and in-flight radio chatter, the game's Saturday matinée narrative places you in a wide range of WWII's lesser-known Partisan engagements, such as aiding the Maquis' sabotage campaign and supporting the Polish Armia Krajowa in Operation Belt. Spread across 49 campaign missions, you'll undertake practically every objective imaginable, from protecting supply trains and escorting bomber convoys, to carrying out stealth reconnaissance and shooting down paratroopers jumping out of enemy transports.

Air Conflicts: Secret Wars

Smoke on the war tour

But while Secret Wars' varied missions prove both competent and generous, the variety of planes on offer exposes the game's greatest weakness. Apart from a couple of noticeably slower bombers, the sixteen iconic fighter planes are virtually indistinguishable. Other than weapon loadouts, you simply won't notice whether you're flying a Spitfire or the jet propelled, delta wing Horton-Ho 229, so similar are their flight speeds and handling. The game also fails to convey any real sensation of speed, and your speedometer is constantly betrayed by the achingly slow passing of trees and buildings underneath.

It's not the only disappointing discrepancy in flight dynamics. There's no rudder to control yaw, limiting angles of rotation to pitch and roll. And there's a constant, overbearing abuse of stall dynamics. Based on speed rather than, correctly, the critical angle of attack, even minor deceleration in level flight invariably ends in a stall. Nowhere is this more apparent than at the permanent invisible ceiling of around 1,400 metres in altitude, which contrives to hem you into the prescribed combat zone by stalling your plane regardless of speed and pitch.

Air Conflicts: Secret Wars

Chasing tail

Fortunately, stalls are as forgiving as they are excessive, and, even at extremely low altitude, they're easy to pull out of with additional thrust. But the closer you get to the ground, the more another weakness looms into view.

Boost IT visibility and business value

Next page: Up the engine

More from The Register

next story
Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax
Without representation, too. Time for a Boston (Lincs) Macbook Party?
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple ran off to IBM
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Apple gets patent for WRIST-PUTER: iTime for a smartwatch
It does everything a smartwatch should do ... but Apple owns it
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.