Feeds

As China rises on the net, website numbers shrink

Government crackdown blacks out 1.4 million sites

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Even as reports put Chinese as the number two language of the Internet, behind only English, strict government control is reducing the number of Websites within China.

With 457 million Internet users behind the Great Firewall, China’s online boom has matched its long economic boom; the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) says in 2000, the country only had around 22.5 million users.

However, in the last year the government has reasserted its strict state control over what all those Chinese-speakers can access: 41 percent of the Websites that existed at the beginning of 2010 had disappeared by the end of that year. From more than 3 million Websites at the start of the year, the total had fallen to just 1.91 million by the end.

CASS cites “pornography” as the main reason for shutdowns, although there’s the usual suspicion that the government is also cracking down on political dissent.

There is, however, an aspect of the data that suggests another force could also be at work. Although the number of sites fell, the CASS study found that the number of pages grew. The state-sponsored agency gave this as evidence of thriving free speech on China’s Internet. CASS media spokesperson Liu Ruisheng is quoted by AFP as saying “our content is getting stronger, while our supervision is getting more strict and more regulated”.

CASS says 60 billion new pages were created during 2010, even though these are hosted on a falling number of domains. In other words, China’s iron control of Internet content is consolidating the number of content hosts in that country.

It certainly wouldn’t surprise El Reg to find that content control was, either intentionally or otherwise, helping concentrate the market power of major hosts, in a country famous for using market control to favour insider capital. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE
Russian Interior Ministry offers big pile o' roubles for busting pro-privacy browser
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know
What do you mean, we've ditched Redmond in favour of IBM?!
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.