Feeds

Stipe croons 'Man on the Moon' to Atlantis crew

Not that any of them ever will be

Security for virtualized datacentres

The crew of Space Shuttle Atlantis were this morning greeted by R.E.M's Michael Stipe, who delivered a vocal snippet of the band's Man on the Moon, followed by a quick message.

Stipe said: “Good morning, Atlantis. This is Michael Stipe from R.E.M. We wish you much success on your mission and thank all the women and men at NASA who have worked on the shuttle for three decades. From Earth, a very good morning to you.”

We suspect that NASA's press office may have had a hand in Stipe's contribution to the increasingly tearful end-of-an-era love-in which the agency has arranged to mark the closure of the shuttle programme.

In a similar message to the International Space Station yesterday, Elton John said: "Good morning, Atlantis, this is Elton John. We wish you much success on your mission. A huge thank you to all the men and women at NASA who worked on the shuttle for the last three decades."

Nonetheless, Stipe's solo rendition of Man On The Moon was certainly all his own work. He explained: "I recorded Man On The Moon for NASA in Venice, Italy, where Galileo first presented to the Venetian government his eight-power telescope, and in 1610 wrote The Starry Messenger (Sidereus Nuncius), an account of his early astronomical discoveries that altered forever our view of our place in the universe."

Back on the ISS, meanwhile, the Atlantis and Expedition 28 station crewmembers are about halfway through unloading 9,403 pounds (4.26 metric tonnes) of spare and supplies from the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module.

Here's NASA's video round-up of yesterday's activities aboard the orbiting outpost, including a couple of shots of just how you shift boxes in space:

The latest news on Atlantis swansong STS-135 mission is right here. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
What's that STINK? Rosetta probe shoves nose under comet's tail
Rotten eggs, horse dung and almonds – yuck
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Kip Thorne explains how he created the black hole for Interstellar
Movie special effects project spawns academic papers on gravitational lensing
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.