Feeds

Google sets up €4.5m academic legal institute in Berlin

Euro law must 'catch up' with using other people's stuff

Security for virtualized datacentres

Google will fund a research centre at Humboldt University in Berlin, which from October will examine the evolution of the internet and its impact on society, science and economy.

The Berlin University of Arts, the Social Science Research Center Berlin and the Hamburg Hans-Bredow-Institute are also involved in the project at Werner Heisenberg's alma mater. Named after academic and statesman Wilhelm von Humboldt, Humboldt University numbers 40 Nobel Prize winners as alumni, including Erwin Schrödinger, Max Planck and Albert Einstein.

The institute in Berlin emphasised that the purpose of the new centre would be to explore web innovations in general, rather than to study issues specifically related to Google, but has revealed that one of the focuses of the new institute will be internet law.

Google has a particular interest in internet law. The company has clashed repeatedly with authorities over data privacy issues in several European countries. In January this year, data protection officials in Germany threatened to pursue a precedent-setting court case because its free service Google Analytics gathers detailed information about website visitors.

Google was also fined €100,000 in France because the cars used to take photographs for Street View illegally collected personal data from Wi-Fi networks. In Switzerland, Google is appealing a court ruling that obliges it to ensure all faces and vehicle licence plates are blurred and Czech privacy authorities recently also imposed new restrictions on Google Street View, including lower camera height.

Google's CEO Eric Schmidt said in a statement that the internet is still "a new frontier for much of the legal profession", and that "the law needs to catch up with the latest technologies". For this reason, the newly founded Institute for Internet and Society will initially be located at Humboldt's law faculty. It will initially employ about 10 people.

Although Google will fund the institute with €4.5m for the first three years, the research unit will be fully independent of Google. In the future, the group will look for other sponsorship, in particular from the German government and the European Union. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
DVLA website GOES TITSUP on day paper car tax discs retire
Welcome to GOV.UK - digital by de ... FAULT
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.