Feeds

Ruby daddy Matsumoto joins Heroku Rails crusade

Some time in cloud land

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Ruby creator Yukihiro Matsumoto has joined Heroku, the San Francisco outfit that cut its teeth with an online service for building, deploying, and readily scaling Ruby on Rails applications.

In recent weeks, Heroku's "cloud" service has expanded beyond Rails to Node.js and Clojure and it intends to embrace additional languages as well, but the Matsumoto hire shows that the Saleforce.com-owned outfit is still very much a Ruby shop. Its "platform cloud" was originally built to ease the deployment of applications in a way that mirrored the effect Rails had on how the company's founders built applications.

"Discovering Rails was one of the big motivators for us – it really sped up development compared to other languages. At one point, the average project took us maybe two months to crank out, but when we switched to Rails, the time dropped to two or three weeks," cofounder Adam Wiggins recently told The Register.

"But the time to deploy didn't change. It's one thing when you spend two months building an app and a month getting it deployed into production. But when you speed three weeks building it and a month getting it into production, things seemed completely out of whack."

Yukihiro Matsumoto

Yukihiri Matsumoto

Matsumoto – known as "Matz" among the Ruby community – will serve as Heroku's chief architect of Ruby. "As a member of our platform development team, Matsumoto-san will continue his work on the Ruby language in close collaboration with the Ruby community, keeping the language open and advancing the technology in exciting new ways. Matz will further accelerate innovation for Ruby and make it even friendlier for developers to build world-class apps,” read a canned statement from Byron Sebastian, a Heroku general manager and the senior vice president of platforms for Salesforce.com.

In addition to his Heroku duties, Matsumoto will continue to work as research fellow at the Network Applied Communication Laboratory, an open source systems-integrator outfit based in Shimane Prefecture, Japan, and he will remain a fellow at the Rakuten Institute of Technology, a research and development house tied to Rakuten, a Japanese e-commerce company.

In late May, Heroku announced that it would "lend support" as Matsumoto sought to expand the Ruby developer community in Japan and around the world, and apparently, everyone involved thought this should be taken a step further.

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
VMware's high-wire balancing act: EVO might drag us ALL down
Get it right, EMC, or there'll be STORAGE CIVIL WAR. Mark my words
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
Better be Nimble, tech giants, or mutant upstarts will make off with your sales
Usual suspects struggling to create competing products
VMware vaporises vCHS hybrid cloud service
AnD yEt mOre cRazy cAps to dEal wIth
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.