Feeds

HTC 'dismayed' by Apple's bizarre patent allegations

Assertions only a lawyer could love

Security for virtualized datacentres

HTC has snapped back at Apple's second patent-infringement complaint over the Taiwanese manufacturer's Android-based smartphones and tablets.

"HTC is dismayed that Apple has resorted to competition in the courts rather than the market place," HTC general counsel Grace Lei said in a canned statement.

The statement notes that HTC introduced a touch-screen smartphone in June 2002 – a full five years before the iPhone made its debut. "As the smart phone market matured," the statement asserts, "Apple initiated litigation campaigns against many of its competitors, including HTC."

Apple's latest complaint against HTC was filed last Friday with the US International Trade Commission, and focuses on "Portable Electronic Devices and Related Software". The patents involved, as listed on the USITC website (account required), seem clearly aimed not only at HTC's smartphones, but also its nascent tablet line, which currently consists of but one product, the Flyer.

One of the patents Apple cites, curiously, is entitled "Portable computers". Though the patent describes a pen-shaped device with accelerometer-sensed writing, its summary refers to "a portable computer arranged to rest comfortably in the hand".

Illustration from United States patent number 6,956,564, 'Portable computers'

Apple's patented 'Portable computers' device is the spittin' image of an iPad, eh?

The device that the "Portable computers" patent describes, however, appears to relate to current tablets in ways best – or only – discernable by patent lawyers. Interestingly, that patent didn't originate at Apple, but was granted in 1999 to British Telecommunications, and subsequently purchased by Apple.

Speaking of patent purchases, HTC's statement also reminds readers of the company's acquisition of S3 Graphics last week – which included that company's portfolio of 235 patents, "including those related to graphics visualization technologies".

We can only assume that HTC's mention of its newly acquired S3 Graphics patent portfolio is a not-so-thinly veiled threat that the patent wars between Apple and HTC have quite a way to go before one or the other is vanquished, or before an armistice is reached.

As Lei concludes: "HTC continues to vehemently deny all of Apple's past and present claims against it and will continue to protect and defend it's [sic] own intellectual property as it has already done this year." ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
HBO shocks US pay TV world: We're down with OTT. Netflix says, 'Gee'
This affects every broadcaster, every cable guy
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.