Feeds

Interwebs IDE hits the mother Node

Joyent on Cloud9

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Cloud9 – a startup offering developers an IDE that runs entirely on the web – has announced that its creation now plugs directly into the Node.js service run by Node chief steward Joyent.

You can now build a Node app, debug it, and deploy it without leaving the the web-based IDE.

Unveiled this past March, Cloud9 is an online IDE (integrated development environment) designed specifically for building applications with JavaScript, including Node, the event-driven, server-side development platform based on Google's V8 JavaScript engine.

Previously, you could build and debug Node apps with Cloud9, but you couldn't deploy – at least not directly. Now, you can deploy straight to Joyent's No.de service, a hosted version of the Node.js platform.

"Before, you needed to push to Github and then push to somewhere else. It was very cumbersome," Cloud9 CEO and cofounder Ruben Daniels tells The Register. "Now, you don't even have to go to [Joyent's No.de] to create your own account. You can press a button in Cloud9 and create an account right there."

Joyent is home to Ryan Dahl, the creator of Node.js. In addition to offering the No.de service, the San Francisco startup uses Node.js to help drive its Amazon EC2–like "infrastructure cloud" service. The platform is also a part of Joyent's SDC6 software, which lets ISPs and other outfits build their own infrastructure clouds.

Cloud9 itself runs atop Joyent's infrastructure cloud.

In addition to Node and JavaScript, the Cloud9 IDE handles HTML, CSS, and – to a lesser degree – CoffeeScript, Ruby, and PHP. The company is now developing a version of its IDE for Python, and this version, currently in "preview mode", will integrate with Google's App Engine.

Cloud9 deploys to Joyent

Cloud9's board advisor is JavaScript inventor and Mozilla CTO Brenden Eich. Though Mozilla was previously developing its own "cloud-based" IDE – known as "Bespin" and then "Skywriter" – the open source outfit has now put its weight behind Cloud9. "They basically gave us the community that used to work on Bespin," Daniels says.

The Bespin project has been rolled into the open source editor at the heart of Cloud9, known as Ace. The editor is available on GitHub under the MPL, GPL, and LGPL licenses, and according to Daniels it's now used by such names as VMware, Salesforce.com, and Facebook.

Cloud9 carries a $15 a month subscription fee, but a free, limited version is also available. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
IT crisis looming: 'What if AWS goes pop, runs out of cash?'
Public IaaS... something's gotta give - and it may be AWS
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
BT claims almost-gigabit connections over COPPER WIRE
Just need to bring the fibre box within 19m ...
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.