Feeds

Interwebs IDE hits the mother Node

Joyent on Cloud9

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Cloud9 – a startup offering developers an IDE that runs entirely on the web – has announced that its creation now plugs directly into the Node.js service run by Node chief steward Joyent.

You can now build a Node app, debug it, and deploy it without leaving the the web-based IDE.

Unveiled this past March, Cloud9 is an online IDE (integrated development environment) designed specifically for building applications with JavaScript, including Node, the event-driven, server-side development platform based on Google's V8 JavaScript engine.

Previously, you could build and debug Node apps with Cloud9, but you couldn't deploy – at least not directly. Now, you can deploy straight to Joyent's No.de service, a hosted version of the Node.js platform.

"Before, you needed to push to Github and then push to somewhere else. It was very cumbersome," Cloud9 CEO and cofounder Ruben Daniels tells The Register. "Now, you don't even have to go to [Joyent's No.de] to create your own account. You can press a button in Cloud9 and create an account right there."

Joyent is home to Ryan Dahl, the creator of Node.js. In addition to offering the No.de service, the San Francisco startup uses Node.js to help drive its Amazon EC2–like "infrastructure cloud" service. The platform is also a part of Joyent's SDC6 software, which lets ISPs and other outfits build their own infrastructure clouds.

Cloud9 itself runs atop Joyent's infrastructure cloud.

In addition to Node and JavaScript, the Cloud9 IDE handles HTML, CSS, and – to a lesser degree – CoffeeScript, Ruby, and PHP. The company is now developing a version of its IDE for Python, and this version, currently in "preview mode", will integrate with Google's App Engine.

Cloud9 deploys to Joyent

Cloud9's board advisor is JavaScript inventor and Mozilla CTO Brenden Eich. Though Mozilla was previously developing its own "cloud-based" IDE – known as "Bespin" and then "Skywriter" – the open source outfit has now put its weight behind Cloud9. "They basically gave us the community that used to work on Bespin," Daniels says.

The Bespin project has been rolled into the open source editor at the heart of Cloud9, known as Ace. The editor is available on GitHub under the MPL, GPL, and LGPL licenses, and according to Daniels it's now used by such names as VMware, Salesforce.com, and Facebook.

Cloud9 carries a $15 a month subscription fee, but a free, limited version is also available. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
IBM rides nightmarish hardware landscape on OpenPOWER Consortium raft
Google mulls 'third-generation of warehouse-scale computing' on Big Blue's open chips
It's GOOD to get RAIN on your upgrade parade: Crucial M550 1TB SSD
Performance tweaks and power savings – what's not to like?
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.