Feeds

New Tosh R&D centres to look into advanced disk tech

HAMRing more data into the platter

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Toshiba is setting up development centres in Ome, Tokyo, to research advanced disk drive technology and hopefully increase disk drive capacities.

One is an HDD Advanced Technology Centre looking at speeding up the development of higher areal density technology. The other is an HDD Manufacturing Technology Centre, and it will work on the manufacturing capabilities needed to productise higher areal density technology.

Tosh is looking at energy-assisted technology, known as HAMR for Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording, and bit-patterned media (BPM). Both technologies aim to shrink the size of a recorded one or zero on a disk's surface and prevent it losing its state through temperature fluctuations or influences from nearby bits. Both these things become more prevalent as the size of the recorded bit shrinks.

Toshiba 2.5-inch 400GB HDD

Toshiba 2.5-inch, 400GB HDD

Current perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) technology has a physical areal density limit, Tosh says, of 1.6Gbit/mm2 (1Tbit/in2), beyond which either HAMR or BPM will have to be used. The transition to either technology looks likely to be very expensive in terms of new manufacturing machinery.

Tosh is partnering with TDK, which makes read/write heads, and Showa Denko, which makes disk drive media, in the Advanced Technology Centre. The centres should open on 16 July.

We have not heard much about this expensive transition from PMR to either HAMR or BPM technology since a Storage Technology Alliance was announced last year, and since a recent wave of disk drive vendor consolidation was announced. Seagate is buying Samsung's HDD business and Western Digital is buying Hitachi GST. This leaves just three HDD vendors worldwide: Seagate; Western Digital, with around 80 per cent of the industry; and Toshiba, which has bought Fujitsu's HDD business.

By setting up these two centres, Toshiba "expects to develop stable manufacturing methods for future cutting-edge HDDs and to achieve the very earliest launch of differentiated products." ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
IBM rides nightmarish hardware landscape on OpenPOWER Consortium raft
Google mulls 'third-generation of warehouse-scale computing' on Big Blue's open chips
It's GOOD to get RAIN on your upgrade parade: Crucial M550 1TB SSD
Performance tweaks and power savings – what's not to like?
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.