Feeds

Oracle coughs up Java 7 release candidate

A non-revolution five years in the making

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Oracle has published the first release candidate for JDK 7, the long-awaited next version of Java set to officially debut on July 28.

On Thursday, during a webcast from the Oracle bunker in Redwood City, California, Java chief architect Mark Reinhold said that the most significant thing about the new release is that "we're finally shipping it". Though it has been nearly five years since the release of Java 6, the new version isn't exactly a huge leap forward.

"We all know for various business and political reasons, this release has taken some time," Reinhold said. "This is not the revolutionary release that some of our past releases have been. This is a more of an evolutionary release. There are some significant improvements, but no really earth-shattering, ground-breaking kinds of features."

The most notable addition, he said, is JSR 203, the new I/O APIs. "We finally have a real file system API that will let you do things like manipulate symbolic links and access file system-specific operations," Reinhold said. He also pointed to the Fork/Join framework (JSR 166y) overseen by concurrency genius Doug Lea, a means of providing true parallelism on the platform. "This is the first step towards really enabling Java for multi-core applications."

There's also JSR 292, for supporting dynamically typed languages on the JVM.

In a blog post, Reinhold said that the release candidate includes only thirteen changes from the last build. Over half are administrative updates, but the rest dealt with "true showstoppers", including several hard VM crashes and a JIT correctness bug related to Eclipse.

Reinholds says this will likely be the only release candidate – unless additional showshoppers are reported. The release must be rubber-stamped by the Java Community Process (JCP) executive committee. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
Torvalds CONFESSES: 'I'm pretty good at alienating devs'
Admits to 'a metric ****load' of mistakes during work with Linux collaborators
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.