Feeds

ICO: Volunteer to be audited by us, we might not bust you

'No, don't do that', says a lawyer

Security for virtualized datacentres

The Information Commissioner's Office said more companies should offer themselves up for voluntary audits.

According to the quango's annual report, a third of organisations offered the chance to be audited by the ICO accepted.

Of the 603 breaches last year, 186 came from private companies. But only 19 per cent of these firms agreed to ICO audits.

The ICO promises its free data protection audits are not about "naming and shaming". The quango has written to some organisations offering the service.

But Kathryn Wynn, senior associate and data protection specialist at law firm Pinsent Masons said: "Companies should sort out their own procedures, and if necessary hire in outside help, before going to the ICO. Companies should have their house in order before calling in the regulator for a stamp of approval."

Wynn said organisations and companies should spend some time thinking about what to do if the worst did happen, as well as work hard to make sure it didn't.

She said: "Often the reaction to a breach is more important – look at Sony – no one can blame them for getting hacked, but you need to react properly afterwards."

A spokesman for the ICO said: "The ICO audit is designed to be constructive. We work with with organisations to find areas of concern and to improve general compliance. The scope of the audit is agreed in advance with companies. If we find a compliance issue we wouldn't necessarily take action."

Information Commissioner Christopher Graham said the organisation had made good progress in cutting the number of overdue Freedom of Information requests – the other part of the quango's responsibilities.

This year also saw the regulator impose its first non-compliance fines. The recipients were: Hertfordshire County Council – £100,000; A4e Limited – £60,000; Ealing Council – £80,000; and Hounslow Council – £70,000.

On European cookie law, Graham said the ICO would only take action against companies which take little action to comply.

You can watch Graham read the intro to the report or download it as a PDF at the ICO's website. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.