Feeds

Glasgow cammer not thrown in slammer

Rob rich, give to poor? Robin Hood pirate nets community service

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

A 25-year-old man has followed in the footsteps of Harrow pirate Emmanuel Nimley after being convicted of using his phone to illegally record movies in a Glasgow cinema.

The conviction is said to be the first of its kind in Scotland, after Christopher Clarke of Keppochhill Road, Sighthill, pleaded guilty on 2 June to a charge under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

He was ordered at the Glasgow Sheriff Court yesterday to complete 160 hours of community service.

Police, Cineworld, and the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT) teamed up to catch Clarke.

FACT said its investigators discovered that Clarke had recorded the entire Robin Hood movie on 12 May 2010 during a press screening of the Ridley Scott film.

The court heard that Clarke had previously uploaded to the internet five other movies he had illegally recorded in cinemas.

In October of last year, then 22-year-old Lincoln Road, Harrow-based Nimley, who had been thrown in jail for six months for fraudulently filming Hollywood films at a Vue cinema, saw his sentence successfully quashed on appeal to a 12-month community order.

The North West Londoner was told to carry out 120 hours of unpaid work during that period.

As we reported at the time, there have been recent successful court actions against the recordings of films in Blighty cinemas, with prosecutors citing the Fraud Act. Nimley’s sentence was seen as a big win for FACT.

However, no jail term was secured against the Harrow pirate, following appeal. Meanwhile, Clarke received only 160 hours of community service.

The Cinema Exhibitors' Association and other flick-industry bodies have long complained that the UK government lags behind Europe and the US because there’s no specific legislation that can be used in a charge such as the one against Nimley or Clarke. ®

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple ran off to IBM
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes
Phone egg, meet desktop chicken - your mother
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!
Grim diversity numbers dumped alongside Facebook earnings
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.