Related topics

Lenovo Thinkpad X220T 12.5in tablet PC

A fondleslab too far?

Screen test

With the new model Lenovo has also attempted to improve its reputation for dim screens. The X220T uses an IPS screen rated at 300 nits, this model uses Gorilla Glass and was markedly more bright than the predecessor-but-one. All the models use matte, antigloss displays. The review sample was equipped with a quadcore Intel i7-2620M processor at 2.7Ghz, 4GB of RAM and, disappointingly, a Hitachi Travelstar 7200rpm HD.

Lenovo ThinkPad X220T

That higher edge on one side is due to the antennae housing

This level of processing power in a portable comes with a penality; protruding from the rear of the machine is a substantial six-cell battery. While some maintain that the tapered battery is useful as a handle when using the machine in tablet, portrait mode, I found that it made the machine look significantly more bulky than it needs to, or would do with the flush three-cell battery.

By comparison with the venerable 15in T42, the X200 felt tiny. Now the X220 feels only slightly smaller. Incidentally, there’s a protrusion at the front lip of the lid that houses the antennas, but this helps to open the lid.

Lenovo ThinkPad X220T

Closed for business

The extra space on the X220T allows the inclusion of both a Trackpad and Trackpoint; the former is multitouch and a one piece design, with no clear indication of which areas activate the left and right buttons. Getting one piece trackpads right is elusive. This one of the few sub-par design decisions on the machine, and I found I shunned it completely. It's possible to turn off the trackpad in the BIOS. Do yourself a favour and save some frustration.

Lenovo ThinkPad X220T

Sponsored: How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers

Next page: Taking the tablet