Feeds

Chinese gov demands less news in internet channels

Seeks to achieve what western media does effortlessly

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

The Chinese regulator has tightened guidelines for video services that get too close to reporting news, resulting in at least one service replacing its news channel with the more-usual internet inanity.

The notice issued by the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT), explains that that the regulator intends to take a much tougher line with online entities providing news, or rebroadcasting news provided by someone else, reminding them that everyone reporting any news needs a licence of some sort.

The notice, reproduced and translated by Marbridge Daily, reminds organisations actually gathering news that they'll need a "Class A" licence, while those hosting content containing news still need a "Class B".

There is also trial classification, "Class D", for broadcasters who let a little news content slip into their otherwise mundane schedules, but it's not clear who that will apply to.

There's no YouTube in China (it probably hasn't got a licence) but local blog Penn Olson reports that the suspiciously similar Chinese equivalent Tudou has replaced its news channel with "a watered-down variety of amusing video clips".

Like all countries, China is struggling to understand how the internet changes society and the government's role within it, but unlike the governments of most developed countries, the government of China likes to keep absolute control of the news media – and that's becoming increasingly difficult as the internet encourages everyone to share everything.

The tightening of the rules comes a week before the 90th anniversary of the Communist Party, prompting Tudou-competitor YouKu to paint its homepage red in celebration (while maintaining its licensed news section) – just in case there was any doubt about where its loyalties lie. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Felony charges? Harsh! Alleged Anon hackers plead guilty to misdemeanours
US judge questions harsh sentence sought by prosecutors
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.