Feeds

Vatican launches second website in just 2000 years

Cunning choice of launch date to avoid server outages

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

The Vatican is to update its notoriously creaky comms operation this week, with a new easy to use and doctrinally sound news portal.

News.va will, apparently, be launched with a papal click of the mouse by Pope Benedict himself, doubtless leading to questions as to whether this will make the site the world's only infallible provider of news.

Significantly, the site will initially launch in English and Italian, with other languages to come on stream in time. There is no indication as to whether there will be a Latin language version.

Monsignor Claudio Maria Celli, whose office spearheaded the development, told the AP the site would aggregate the Vatican's assorted news operations, which include radio and TV broadcasts.

It will be integrated with Twitter and Facebook from the off. Celli said he hoped it would encourage some of the stick-in-the-muds in the Vatican to up their game when it comes to its own internal communication.

"I think that we must educate the Roman Curia of what is the real meaning of communication," Celli said. "Little by little they will perceive that this is the real meaning to be present, to have a relevance."

The increased focus on social networking follows much arguing within the church as to whether blogs, Twitter and the like are a means to evangelisation or tools of the devil designed to alienate and lead astray the faithful.

However, the fact the Pope will be pushing the button shouldn't be seen as an endorsement of social networking, or imposing his infallible imprimatur on the internet.

Good Catholics and good Vatican watchers will of course be familiar with the ins and outs of dogma of infallibility. For non-Latin readers the essential point is that the Pope is only infallible when he says he is infallible.

Similarly, conspiracy theorists will wonder what the significance is of the launch date. It is, apparently, the 60th anniversary of Pope Benedict's ordination as a priest.

It is also the Feast of Sts Peter and Paul, and as such a Holy Day of Obligation, on which Catholics are required to attend mass. Which is one way of ensuring that the site is not immediately swamped by the faithful. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?