Feeds

50 day lullaby of Lulzsec is over .. for now

Update: Anon picks up baton

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

After fifty days of wreaking security busting mayhem on websites round the globe, Lulzsec says it's hanging up its hacking hats.

Perhaps to forestall accusations either that its members were sinking the LulzBoat in response to rival TeamPoison's threat to expose its members, or that they're clearing out the basement before the police arrive, LulzSec issued its farewell on the PirateBay on Sunday claiming that its demise had been planned: “Bon voyage. Our planned 50 day cruise has expired,” the note said.

“For the past 50 days we’ve been disrupting and exposing corporations, governments, often the general population itself, and quite possibly everything in between, just because we could,” the group wrote in its farewell statement.

The reason for abandoning ship was not given but with the arrest in the UK of alleged hacker, 19 year old Ryan Cleary of Wickford, Essex last week, the heat is on the underground group.

On Saturday, Cleary’s defense attorney argued for his release on bail claiming that he had been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome since his arrest and has agoraphobia. Media reports claim that FBI officials have flown to Britain to question Cleary as part of their investigation.

Via Twitter, LulzSec refuted claims that he is affiliated with the group. Despite its dispersion, the LulzSec crew added that “we hope, wish, even beg, that the movement manifests itself into a revolution that can continue on without us. The support we've gathered for it in such a short space of time is truly overwhelming, and not to mention humbling. Please don't stop.”

In a parting gesture, the group dumped one last time, revealing an assortment of begged, borrowed and stolen data treats including internal memos, gamer user details, website log ins and miscellaneous files from the data vaults of companies including AOL, AT&T, Battlefield Heroes, Hackforums.net and Nato-bookshop.org.

The collection of files is an intricate and eclectic scrapbook. The AT&T file is the biggest, featuring a range of internal documents, many revolving around the carrier’s LTE network. Another, entitled “Office Networks of Corporations” contains IP addresses of internal corporate networks from prior hack targets The Walt Disney Company, Sony, Qwest Communications and EMI.

“Oh, oh, finally! Media, please be sure to report on the actual files we leaked, not just our silly press statement,” the groups last Tweet (at press time) read. ®

Update: Anonymous, alert to the publicity possibilities, has picked up the LulzSec baton. LulzSec handed its Twitter support to Anonymous, which has tweeted that the "AntiSec" campaign has its full support.

Hooray. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?